Daily Archives: September 6, 2012 - 4 results


Posted 2 years ago in Crime Criminal Law by Aaron Kase  
Drew Peterson Found Guilty of Wife’s Murder

Former Illinois police officer Drew Peterson was found guilty today in the 2004 murder of his third wife, Kathleen Savio. Peterson is also suspected of killing his fourth wife, Stacy Ann Cales. It took two days for the jury to return a guilty verdict in Savio’s death. Her body was found in a dry bathtub a few months after the couple’s 2003 divorce, but her death was initially ruled an unintentional drowning despite a laceration on her head and the …

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Posted 2 years ago in by Jennifer King  
Read the Latest Issue of ‘Your Home & The Law’ Newsletter

Selling Your ‘Under Water’ Home Through a Short Sale If you bought and financed your home at a time when the real estate market was booming, there might come a time when you realize your home is worth less than what you owe to your lender. When property values drop, homeowners can find themselves “under water.” If you’ve found a buyer for your home, you may be able to convince your lender to forgive part of your mortgage. Find Out …

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Posted 2 years ago in Criminal Law by Aaron Kase  
University of Colorado Says Guns Okay on Campus, Not in Dorms

The University of Colorado in Boulder has revised its rules for carrying firearms on campus, after the state Supreme Court ruled in March that the school cannot maintain a blanket ban on guns for students who have concealed carry permits. Under the new rules, guns will still not be allowed in the dormitories, with certain exceptions for family housing units. Thanks to the Concealed Carry Act the state passed in 2003, residents with permits are free to carry their weapons …

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Posted 2 years ago in Government by Michele Bowman  
Texas Voter ID Law Struck Down, Heads to Supreme Court

Texas state officials continue to insist that the state’s controversial voter ID law is valid, despite a federal appeals court ruling on Aug 30 that the law is “retrogressive,” meaning it reduces the voting strength of minorities. The U.S. Supreme Court will likely have the last say – possibly before the elections in November. A three-judge panel in Washington, DC agreed with the Department of Justice, which had refused to “pre-clear” the law in March in a review process required …

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