Read the Latest Issue of ‘Your Job & The Law’ Newsletter

Posted November 7, 2012 in Labor and Employment Video by

Lawyers.com | Your Job & The Law

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Obesity Now Considered a Workplace Disability

When the Americans with Disabilities Act was originally created, obesity was considered a disability only when due to an underlying physiological disorder such as diabetes. Today, any type of obesity is considered a disability, meaning obese employees have new rights in the workplace and cannot be discriminated against because of their weight.

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Can You Badmouth Your Boss Online? [Video]

You have the right to call your employer names on Facebook, thanks to the National Labor Relations Act, which has been protecting the rights of workers since 1935. New decisions under the law say you can publicly call your boss a swear word on Facebook so long as two conditions are met.

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Wisconsin Judge Restores Stripped Workers’ Rights

A judge in Wisconsin has restored collective bargaining rights to Wisconsin’s public sector employees, ruling that a law signed by Gov. Scott Walker limiting union power is unconstitutional. The 2011 law stripped the right of public sector unions to collectively bargain for anything besides wage increases, which could be no greater than the cost of inflation.

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Have an Employment Law Question?

The Lawyers.com employment law forums should be one of your first stops if you’re grappling with a job-related legal problem or issue. Covering topics including discrimination, labor unions, workers’ comp and sexual harassment, these forums are the place to ask questions and get answers before you hire an employment lawyer.

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Mesothelioma Victims Awarded Billions [Video]

For decades the asbestos industry hid the fact that breathing asbestos causes mesothelioma, a fatal cancer. Among those who have been sickened: Countless workers who were exposed to asbestos on the job. If you’ve been sickened by asbestos, you may be entitled to compensation.

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