Monthly Archives: December 2012


Posted 1 year ago in Criminal Law News of the Weird by Chuck Shepherd  
Gunman Sues His Victim for Firing Back in Self-Defense

LEGAL NEWS OF THE WEIRD – Samuel Cutrufelli, 31, filed a lawsuit in October in Sacramento County, Calif., claiming that Jay Leone, 90, “negligently” shot him. Cutrufelli had burglarized Leone’s home in Greenbrae, unaware that Leone was home. When Leone reached for one of his stashed handguns, Cutrufelli shot him in the jaw and then pulled the trigger point-blank at Leone’s head, but was out of bullets. Leone then shot Cutrufelli several times, which Cutrufelli apparently felt was entirely unnecessary. …

Read More Leave a Comment

Posted 1 year ago in Jury Awards Litigation by Sylvia Hsieh  
Music Mogul Must pay $1 Million Reward for Lost Laptop

For many of us, our whole life is on our laptop. And if it were lost, we would give anything to get it back. That’s how music producer and singer-songwriter Ryan Leslie felt when lost a bag containing his MacBook, $10,000 in cash and his passport while he was on tour in Cologne, Germany two years ago. The distraught Leslie, who has stored all the songs for a new album on his hard drive, initially offered a $20,000 reward to …

Read More Leave a Comment

Posted 1 year ago in Creditor/Debtor Foreclosure Taxation by Michele Bowman  
Expiration of Debt Relief Act Could Revive Mortgage Crisis

A federal law that has helped consumers avoid paying taxes on money they never even had is set to expire at the end of the year. If it does, homeowners who are forgiven any of their debt when they are foreclosed on will have to pay income tax on the forgiven amount.   Forgiven “Income” To Be Taxed It seems crazy, but it’s true: Normally, if a homeowner owes $100,000 on her mortgage, but the property sells in foreclosure for …

Read More Leave a Comment

Posted 1 year ago in Labor and Employment by Aaron Kase  
Supreme Court to Define Supervisors in Discrimination Case

The Supreme Court on Nov. 26 heard arguments in a case that could redefine who is considered a supervisor in the workplace for legal purposes. The ruling could have far-reaching effects, because the broader the definition of supervisor, the easier it is for employees to bring discrimination cases against their employer. In Vance v. Ball State University, justices will decide whether the university is responsible for alleged racial harassment experienced by a catering employee. Maetta Vance was the only black …

Read More Leave a Comment