Daily Archives: February 25, 2013 - 5 results


Posted 1 year ago in Crime Editors Picks Government by Josh Crank  
Deepwater Horizon Trial Kicks Off with Finger Pointing

Federal Judge Carl Barbier heard opening statements today in the trial of BP, Transocean Ltd. and Halliburton Co. for their roles in the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion that killed 11 workers and dumped millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. While prosecutors characterized the companies as preoccupied with savings and profits rather than safety and people, attorneys for BP, Transocean and Halliburton pointed fingers at one another. Assistant U.S. Attorney Mike Underhill placed much of …

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Posted 1 year ago in Criminal Law Editors Picks by Larry Bodine  
Court Rules There is No Right to Carry a Concealed Weapon

In a sweeping ruling, the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that there is no Second Amendment right to carry a concealed firearm in public. The broad wording of the decision in Peterson v. Martinez creates a far-reaching national precedent against carrying a loaded handgun outside the home. The case began on a narrow point – a challenge by a Washington State man against Colorado’s law to issue CHL permits (“Concealed Handgun License”) only to state residents. But the …

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Posted 1 year ago in Criminal Law Selecting a Lawyer by Betsy Kim  
Private Attorney vs. Public Defender [Infographic]

If a defendant is too poor to hire a lawyer, the court will appoint an attorney for free. But unless there’s a conflict of interests, neither the client nor lawyer has a choice in the assignment. The Criminal Justice Degrees Schools infographic spells out such differences between these types of legal representation. Defendants charged with violent crimes and rapes are represented seven percent of the time by private attorneys compared to four percent of the time by public defenders. Yet …

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If You Live in PA, Your Home Address Isn’t Private

Home addresses that are part of public records can be disclosed to the public via open records requests, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled last week. The court upheld a 2012 lower court decision that stated “there is no constitutional right to privacy in one’s home address under the Pennsylvania Constitution.” Most state laws specifically exempt home addresses from records requests, as does the federal Freedom of Information Act. The Pennsylvania ruling is in response to a lawsuit filed by Mel M. Marin, who wanted …

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Posted 1 year ago in Crime Immigration by Michele Bowman  
Guilty Plea Means Deportation, Says Supreme Court

The U.S. Supreme Court on Feb. 20 held that one of its 2010 rulings – that under the Sixth Amendment, criminal defense attorneys must warn their clients that guilty pleas can result in deportation – does not apply retroactively. In Chaidez v. United States, the Court said Padilla v. Kentucky, the 2010 case, was not retroactive because it created a new rule about warning defendants, as opposed to simply applying existing rules.   Sorry, Says Court: Play It Forward Roselva …

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