Lease Agreements and Community Property

Stanley Dawe Prowse's Family Law Legal Blogs

Licensed for 43 years

Attorney in Carlsbad, CA

Stanley Dawe Prowse

Credit cards accepted, Fixed hourly rates

Serving Carlsbad, CA

  • Serving Carlsbad, CA

  • Credit cards accepted, Fixed hourly rates

Certified Family Law Attorney at firm The Law Office of Stanley D. Prowse

Serving Carlsbad, CA

Credit cards accepted, Fixed hourly rates

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A man recently approached us with a complicated situation. Though he and his wife mutually agreed that divorce was in their family’s best interest, her reaction was negative, to say the least when he served her with divorce papers. She promptly threatened to give a 30-day notice to dissolve the lease agreement on the condo the couple rent, which, problematically for the husband, is leased only in her name. After those 30 days, she plans to move to another town, into an apartment where she has already cosigned a lease with her new boyfriend. To add fuel to the fire, the couple shares a 12-year-old daughter who wishes to remain with the father because she is afraid of her mother’s boyfriend. Of course, the mother wants custody of the daughter. This man states he can’t afford the rent on his own, and he believes his wife is trying to put him on the streets. His questions: Can she just throw him out? Can she just end the lease?

The leasehold interest, although hers as far as the landlord is concerned, is community property, so it, therefore, belongs to both the wife and the husband. Legally, her ability to evict him as a subtenant is exceedingly dismal. If she proposes to stop paying the rent and move out herself, that might be prohibited under the automatic restraining orders printed on the second page of his petition, because she’d be disposing of community property without his consent. However, we, of course, had to give him the honest truth about this situation. This type of discrepancy is highly technical and academic; dealing with it in a divorce case would be time-consuming, and the result problematic. The reality is that if no one is paying the rent, he’ll have the landlord evicting him, no matter the status of his wife. The best thing for this man to do for himself and his daughter is to find a place to live that he can afford. That way, he isn’t dependent on the actions of his soon to be ex-wife.

For more information on community property, as well as tenant protection, please visit their following respective pages on our website: http://stanprowse.com/community-property and http://stanprowse.com/real-estate-law/landlord-tenant-law

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