Changes to Virginia Landlord-Tenant Law on Security Deposits, Early Termination

Broderick Coleman Dunn's Landlord and Tenant Law Legal Blogs

Licensed for 9 years

Attorney in Fairfax, VA

Broderick Coleman Dunn

571-732-3697

Credit cards accepted, Fixed hourly rates, Fixed fees available

Serving Fairfax, VA

  • Serving Fairfax, VA

  • Credit cards accepted, Fixed hourly rates, Fixed fees available

Associate at firm Cook Craig & Francuzenko, PLLC

Serving Fairfax, VA

Credit cards accepted, Fixed hourly rates, Fixed fees available

The Virginia Legislature recently enacted legislation which makes
some significant changes to the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act
("VRLTA").  Generally, the VRLTA establishes the rights and
obligations of residential landlords and tenants.  While the VRLTA covers
most residential rental agreements, several types of properties such as
single-family rental houses where the landlord owns and rents fewer than ten
such houses, are exempt from the Act.  Additionally, single-family
dwellings may be covered by the VRLTA if the lease states that the VRLTA will
apply.

Under HB 1734, there are several significant changes.  First,
Landlords may now deposit an abandoned security deposit into the Virginia
Housing Partnership Revolving Fund upon the expiration of one year from the
date of the end of the 45-day statutory period.  Under the old VRLTA,
Landlords had to hold abandoned security deposits in their real estate escrow
account for seven years. 

Another major change to the VRLTA is that now, Landlords will be
able to have a lease provision that allows for early termination of a
month-to-month tenancy for a single-family residence.  Under the current
version of the VRLTA, a month-to-month tenancy may not be terminated by either
party without giving 30 days’ notice, in writing, prior to the next rent due
date.

Lastly, HB 1734 allows real estate licensees, as well as other
parties, to appear in General District Court and obtain judgment and possession
against a tenant who appears in court.  This is significant because it
allows individuals, other than attorneys, to represent a limited liability
company or corporation in court against tenants. 
The full text of the bill is available here:

http://leg1.state.va.us/cgi-bin/legp504.exe?131+ful+CHAP0563

Broderick C. Dunn
(571) 732-3697
Cook Craig & Francuzenko, PLLC
3050 Chain Bridge Road, Suite 200
Fairfax, VA 22030

The Virginia Legislature recently enacted legislation which makes
some significant changes to the Virginia Residential Landlord Tenant Act
("VRLTA").  Generally, the VRLTA establishes the rights and
obligations of residential landlords and tenants.  While the VRLTA covers
most residential rental agreements, several types of properties such as
single-family rental houses where the landlord owns and rents fewer than ten
such houses, are exempt from the Act.  Addition

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