Gregory Scott Robey

Fixed hourly rates, Fixed fees available

Serving Cleveland, OH

  • Serving Cleveland, OH

  • Fixed hourly rates, Fixed fees available

Member at firm Robey & Robey

Serving Cleveland, OH

Fixed hourly rates, Fixed fees available

Awards CV Notable

What is white collar crime?

Criminal violations that involve fraudulent and illegal financial transactions in the absence of violence are referred to under the broad term of white collar crime.  Coined in 1939 by sociologist Edwin H. Sutherland, white collar crimes are typically committed by individuals with socially respected professions.  In fact, the occupations the offenders hold oftentimes allow them to commit these serious, non-violent crimes.

White collar crimes include these criminal offenses:

?         Tax fraud

?         Investment fraud

?         Insider trading

?         Embezzlement

?         Money laundering

?         Racketeering and organized theft

?         Bribery

?         Forgery

?         Antitrust violations

?         Healthcare fraud

These types of crimes involve complex transactions that often require specialized knowledge to conduct and have serious impacts on society and on the economy.  A skillful Ohio criminal law attorney can understand the complexity of case and provides legal advice according changes in law. Recent changes in white collar crime have effectively altered the punishments associated with corporate offenses and reviewed below.

Sarbanes-Oxley Act

Also known as the Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act was established in 2002. It was a Congressional response to multiple elaborate white collar crimes committed in 2001, including Enron, WorldCom, and the Arthur Andersen accounting firm corporate scandals.  Effective in increasing the punishments administered for mail fraud and wire fraud from a maximum of five years in prison to a maximum of 20 years in prison, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act also deems that corporate officers falsifying financial reports be charged with a criminal offense and, if convicted, punished by criminal sanctions, including ten year in prison and a $5 million fine. Finally, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act included a directive for the United States Sentencing Commission to evaluate and make changes to the sentencing guidelines that it uses for white collar crimes.

Implications of changes in white collar crime

While in the past, punishments for white collar crimes were modest, the recognition that these types of corporate crimes inflict great harm on society has resulted in harsher and more vigorous punishments.  An experienced Ohio criminal defense attorney can explain in more detail the recent changes in the law.

Contact a white collar attorney in Ohio

If you are facing a white collar crime charge in Cleveland, Ohio, contact the Law Offices of Gregory Scott Robey today.

Criminal violations that involve fraudulent and illegal financial transactions in the absence of violence are referred to under the broad term of white collar crime.  Coined in 1939 by sociologist Edwin H. Sutherland, white collar crimes are typically committed by individuals with socially respected professions.  In fact, the occupations the offenders hold oftentimes allow them to commit these serious, non-violent crimes.

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