Tag Archives: sovereign immunity


Posted 12 months ago in Jury Awards Personal Injury by Sylvia Hsieh  
Appeals Court Guts $10M Award for Football Player’s Death

An appeals court virtually erased a $10 million jury award to the family of a college football player who died during practice in 2008. Ereck Plancher, a receiver for the University of Central Florida football team, was doing conditioning drills during an offseason workout when he collapsed and died. His family sued the UCF Athletics Association, an organization that operates the football program, for wrongful death. They argued that the athletics association didn’t follow its own procedures in treating their …

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Posted 12 months ago in Personal Injury by Aaron Kase  
Transit Authority Not Liable for Dead Man on Bus

The Philadelphia-area public transit agency is not liable for a man who died on a bus and whose corpse was subsequently driven across the city, a judge ruled recently. Leonard Sedden posthumously made the headlines in 2010 after he was found dead on a night-owl SEPTA bus. The driver initially noticed that he was drooling and had urinated in his seat, but a supervisor instructed her to finish her route and not seek medical attention for her passenger. An hour …

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Posted 1 year ago in Personal Injury by Aaron Kase  
University Sued for Gruesome Attack by Deranged Student

A student at Morgan State University in Baltimore is suing the school after he was attacked by another student with a baseball bat. Joshua Ceasar, 23, claims that the university should have recognized “escalating warning signs” that Alexander Kinyua was dangerous and posed a threat to other students. Kinuya pummeled Ceasar last spring with a barbed wire-covered bat in a beating that left the victim partially blind. Ceasar says the school failed to act after Kinyua posted a series of …

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Posted 2 years ago in Criminal Law Government Litigation by Michele Bowman  
Prisoner Wants to Sue Feds for Sexual Assault by Guards

The federal government is safe from most lawsuits under the concept of immunity. But it may not be safe from itself: Its own lawyers decided an indigent prisoner who claims prison guards sexually assaulted him just might be right that he should be allowed to sue the federal government. The U.S. Supreme Court on Feb. 19 heard oral arguments in Millbrook v. United States, a remarkable case originally brought by Kim Millbrook, a prisoner without a lawyer who reportedly hand-wrote …

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