Tag Archives: U.S. Supreme Court


Employers Can Snoop Through Your Cell Phone

It’s hard to imagine getting fired based on text messages or videos on your own personal cell phone, but according to one federal appeals court, it’s absolutely legal – at least under one federal law designed to protect electronic transmissions. The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Dec. 12 said the Stored Communications Act (SCA) did not protect a city employee from her employer using the contents of her cell phone to fire her.    Phone Taken by Snooping …

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Posted 1 year ago in Labor and Employment by Aaron Kase  
Supreme Court to Define Supervisors in Discrimination Case

The Supreme Court on Nov. 26 heard arguments in a case that could redefine who is considered a supervisor in the workplace for legal purposes. The ruling could have far-reaching effects, because the broader the definition of supervisor, the easier it is for employees to bring discrimination cases against their employer. In Vance v. Ball State University, justices will decide whether the university is responsible for alleged racial harassment experienced by a catering employee. Maetta Vance was the only black …

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Posted 1 year ago in Insurance Law Labor and Employment by Michele Bowman  
Company Demands Cost of Medical Bills from Injured Employee

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments this week in a case that could change workers’ ability to hire lawyers to help them bring personal injury suits when their employers have paid for their medical expenses.   Subrogation Blues James McCutchen, a US Airways employee, was seriously injured in a car accident. He settled a negligence suit with the driver responsible for the accident and collected uninsured motorist coverage from his own insurance – after his employer, US Airways, had paid $66,866 …

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Posted 1 year ago in Government by Aaron Kase  
Federal Court Tosses Michigan Affirmative Action Ban

A federal court this month threw out Michigan’s ban on affirmative action in college admissions, the latest volley in the nationwide debate over if and to what extent race can be considered when deciding who gets admitted to institutions of higher education. The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Ohio decided in an 8-7 vote that the affirmative action ban was in violation of the U.S. Constitution. A district court had previously upheld the ban, which could be appealed …

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Posted 2 years ago in Internet Law by Michele Bowman  
Court Says No Privacy in Yahoo! Emails

If you thought your Gmail or Yahoo! mail accounts were safe from prying eyes, think again. The illusion of privacy in cyberspace took yet another hit on Oct. 10 when the South Carolina Supreme Court declared, in effect, that reading someone else’s Yahoo! emails doesn’t violate federal law. The Stored Communications Act is an archaic 1986 federal law that courts are still trying to apply to technologies that were never even imagined when the law was drafted. Judges are forced …

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