Troubling News: Study Shows Teens With Concussion Prone to Depression

A new study published in the Journal of Adolescent Health
shows that teens with a history of concussion are three times more
likely to suffer from depression than teens who have never had a
concussion.  The results of this study point to a need for more
intensive psychological screening for teens who have suffered traumatic
head injuries, particularly those with injuries that have been diagnosed
as concussive.
What Does This Study Reveal?

The study examined health information from more than 36,000 children
between the ages of 12 and 17.  Out of all of the records examined, 2.7
percent of the patients had been diagnosed with concussion and 3.4
percent had been diagnosed as suffering from depression.  When the
numbers were analyzed, teens over the age of 15, those who lived in
poverty and those who had a parent with mental health issues were more
likely than the general population to suffer from depression. 

However, when those factors were accounted for, there was still a
large disparity in the numbers between teens who had previously suffered
a traumatic head injury resulting in a concussion and those who had
not.  While most of these depressive incidents occurred within a
relatively short time period after the brain injury, changes in the brain could mean long-term depressive issues as well.

Furthermore, the researchers found little difference in the brain
scans of adolescents with TBIs and depression and those of adults who
developed depression after a traumatic brain injury.  Medical science
has already seen the link between adult TBI and depression; now, it
appears that adolescents may also exhibit the same symptoms.

What Do These Results Mean?

The results of this study point to one more example of the ways that even “minor” traumatic brain injuries
can impact victims’ lives.  When someone suffers a traumatic brain
injury, or TBI, he or she may experience a wide variety of symptoms and
issues.  Some of these issues may eventually heal or be resolved; others
may continue throughout the victim’s lifetime.  Either way, victims of
TBIs may be entitled to recover damages for their injuries.

Scarlett Law Group represents victims who have suffered both “minor” and “serious” TBIs. With the help of the attorneys at Scarlett Law Group,
a victim may be able to recover damages for his or her injuries,
including payment of medical bills, compensation for pain and suffering
and recovery of lost wages and other expenses.

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Randall H. Scarlett

Licensed since 1988

Member at firm Scarlett Law Group

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Licensed since 1988

Member at firm Scarlett Law Group

AWARDS

AV Preeminent

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